Louisville’s Loss, Brandenburg’s Boon

 

It will cost $400K to move Confederate memorial
Louisville’s Confederate monument to be used for tourism in Brandenburg

Meade County officials voted Wednesday to accept Louisville’s 121-year-old Confederate monument a day after Mayor Greg Fischer announced the controversial memorial was being shipped 44 miles down the Ohio River.

Dismantling and moving the monument will cost about $400,000, according to the University of Louisville Foundation, which is paying for most of it.

Brandenburg Mayor Ronnie Joyner said it was a unanimous decision by the six-member council. He said the 70-foot tall memorial will be placed alongside other historic Civil War sites in the city’s downtown area.

“It’s a tourism thing,” Joyner said. “… It fits in with everything else we’re trying to do with the theme of our riverfront.”

 

Joyner said he has received about five phone calls from Brandenburg residents who were concerned about accepting the Confederate monument. He said those individuals are worried about a rise in Confederate symbolism in the area.

“A lot of people would like to make this into a black versus white thing,” Joyner said. “And that’s not what this monument is about.”

“One lady called me – and this lady was white – she was very against it and she wanted to know if I had checked with the African-American community,” he added. “We don’t have an African-American community as such. By that I mean we don’t have just a place where the blacks all live.”

Recent Census figures show Meade County’s black population is about 4 percent.

In April, Fischer and former U of L President James Ramsey announced the monument would be dismantled and moved, which ignited a fierce local debate over race, slavery and historic preservation. Messer Construction crews are scheduled to begin disassembling the monument, which is located on Third Street near the University of Louisville campus, on Saturday.

Fischer spokesman Chris Poynter said Wednesday the U of L Foundation is paying for those costs, but in a statement Tuesday afternoon chairwoman Brucie Moore said it is  paying about $350,000 and the city is paying around $50,000 to have the statue deconstructed, moved and reconstructed in Brandenburg.

Moore said the agreement was made several months prior to her taking over at the university’s foundation.

“We are glad to find this process moving to completion in a way that respects the campus community’s wishes while preserving the historic value of the monument,” she said.

Meade County officials are expecting to dole out roughly $10,000 to pay for the new foundation for the Confederate monument, Joyner said.

Source: Louisville’s Confederate monument to be used for tourism in Brandenburg | Courier-Journal