Why Civil War Ended 16 Months After Surrender

General Robert E. Lee surrendering his Army of Northern Virginia to Union Army General Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox, Virginia, 1865. (Credit: Ed Vebell/Getty Images)

On April 9, 1865, General Robert E. Lee surrendered his Confederate troops to the Union’s Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court HouseVirginia, marking the beginning of the end of the grinding four-year-long American Civil War. But it would be more than 16 months before President Andrew Johnson would declare a formal end to the conflict in August 1866.

Appomattox was undoubtedly a decisive victory for the Union, and Grant’s peace agreement with Lee would provide a blueprint for other generals around the country. So why did it take so long for the war to officially end after that?

Union General William Tecumseh Sherman, left, meeting General Joseph E. Johnston to discuss terms of surrender of Confederate forces in North Carolina. (Credit: Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
Union General William Tecumseh Sherman, left, meeting General Joseph E. Johnston to discuss terms of surrender of Confederate forces in North Carolina. (Credit: Universal History Archive/Getty Images)

The Next to Fall

For one thing, Lee had surrendered only his Army of Northern Virginia to Grant. A number of other Confederate forces still remained active, starting with Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of Tennessee, the second-largest Confederate army after Lee’s

On April 12 in 

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(The opinions in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of Southern Nation News or SN.O.)

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