Archive For The “Southern History” Category

Today in Southern History: Adobe Walls II

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Today in Southern History: Adobe Walls II

27 June 1974   On this date in 1874… A Comanche war party attacked a group of twenty-eight buffalo hunters, including Bat Masterson, in what is now Hutchinson County, Texas. The buffalo hunters’ deadly long-range fire successfully held off Chief Quanah Parker and a band of more than 300 warriors in what became known as the Second…

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A Breach in the Wall

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A Breach in the Wall

A Review of: Look Homeward by David Herbert Donald, Little, Brown, 1987. When David Herbert Donald recalls his youthful reaction to Look Homeward, Angel, he describes a magic that many of us felt upon encountering… » …

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Today in Southern History: The Last Elvis Concert

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Today in Southern History: The Last Elvis Concert

26 June 1977   On this date in 1977… Elvis Presley gave what would be his last live performance before a packed crowd at Market Square Arena in Indianapolis, Indiana. Other Years: 1791 – American negotiators, led by William Blount, began the illegal Treaty of Holston negotiations today with the Cherokee. 1844 – John Tyler of Virginia…

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The AP Gets It Wrong…Again

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The AP Gets It Wrong…Again

In a recent column for the Associated Press, entitled “Old South monument backers embrace Confederate Catechism”, writer Jay Reeves opines that that those of us who seek to remember the Confederacy and Southern culture are… » …

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Today in Southern History: Virginia Statehood

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Today in Southern History: Virginia Statehood

25 June 1788   On this date in 1788… The Commonwealth of Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution against Patrick Henry’s advice and became the 10th U.S. state. Other Years: 1528 – Spanish Adventurer Pánfilo de Narváez and his expedition crossed the Suwannee River to occupy a village of forty houses they called Apalachen, in Florida where they…

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Today in Southern History: The Roswell Incident Report

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Today in Southern History: The Roswell Incident Report

24 June 1997   On this date in 1997… The Air Force released a report on the so-called “Roswell U.F.O. Incident,” suggesting the alien bodies witnesses reported seeing in 1947 were actually life-sized dummies. The report still does not explain why the dummies were passengers on a weather balloon. Other Years: 1832 – The U.S. Supreme Court…

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Podcast Episode 77

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The Week in Review at the Abbeville Institute, June 19-23, 2017 Topics: Southern Symbols, Political Correctness, Andrew Lytle, Southern Culture …

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Cultural Marxist Richmond Mayor Caves In–Did you honestly expect anything different?

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by Al Benson Jr. Member Board of Directors, Confederate Society of America Just last evening I received an article from the Virginia Flaggers which illustrated our continuing problem with cultural Marxism this year in the South. The article stated, in part, that: “Following the lead of disgraced New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, Mayor Levar Stoney…

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Today in Southern History: The State of Texas

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Today in Southern History: The State of Texas

23 June 1845   On this date in 1845… The Texas legislature in special session voted to accept annexation by the United States after ten years as an independent republic with the proviso that the state would resume its independence if statehood ever caused injury to Texas. In 1861, Texas exercised this right. Other Years: 1704 –…

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Is the Confederacy Obsolete?

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Is the Confederacy Obsolete?

The past—what we believe happened and what we think it means—can be a very slippery customer. Even the recent past can be elusive. In the early 1950s, when I was a student at Johns Hopkins,… » …

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Today in Southern History: The Treaty Reprisals

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Today in Southern History: The Treaty Reprisals

22 June 1839   On this date in 1839… In Indian Territory, Chief Major Ridge was shot and killed. His son, John Ridge was dragged from his bed, and stabbed to death. Elias Boudinot, first editor of the Cherokee Phoenix, was stabbed and hacked to death by Cherokee partisans for their part in the treaty accepting Cherokee…

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The Real Reason Confederate Symbols are Attacked

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The Real Reason Confederate Symbols are Attacked

This piece was originally printed in Southern Partisan Magazine in 1994. By the 1970s, all vestiges of legal discrimination in the South had been eliminated. Indeed, affirmative action programs, minority entitlements, and special considerations in the… » …

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Battlefield comes back to life with anniversary this weekend

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Battlefield comes back to life with anniversary this weekend

Staunton River Battlefield State Park, VA – The Historic Staunton River Foundation and the Staunton River Battlefield State Park invite the public to attend the annual commemoration of the 153rd anniversary of the Battle of Staunton River Bridge in Halifax and Charlotte counties. An array of events and programs has been planned for Friday and…

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Today in Southern History: The Philadelphia Three

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Today in Southern History: The Philadelphia Three

21 June 1964   On this date in 1964… Three civil rights workers , Michael H Schwerner, Andrew Goodman & James E Chane, were released from jail in Philadelphia, Mississippi. Their bodies were found buried in an earthen dam six weeks later. Eight members of the Ku Klux Klan went to prison on federal conspiracy charges, but…

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The Ad Too Hot to Print—Progressive Censorship in Action

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The Ad Too Hot to Print—Progressive Censorship in Action

The promise of “Freedom of the Press” becomes meaningless when large national “Progressive/Liberal” conglomerates maintain a virtual monopoly on access to newsprint within a given geographical area. Their virtual monopoly provides them with the opportunity… » …

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Confederate Gen. Leonidas Polk honored at site where he died in Kennesaw

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Confederate Gen. Leonidas Polk honored at site where he died in Kennesaw

The site of Confederate Gen. Leonidas Polk’s death by a Union cannonball is marked by a memorial pillar and is surrounded by a quiet neighborhood in what is now Kennesaw. Though the Civil War ended in 1865, the sound of rifle blasts rang out once more near the spot where the respected general took his…

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Today in Southern History: The Ruddle’s Station Massacre

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Today in Southern History: The Ruddle’s Station Massacre

20 June 1780   On this date in 1780… British Captain Henry Bird, leading a force of 250 whites and 850 Indians attacked 300 American settlers who had taken refuge at Ruddle’s Station, Kentucky. When Bird’s force used cannon against the stockade, the settlers realized they were outmatched and surrendered. Upon their opening the gate, the Indians…

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Understanding Andrew Lytle

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Understanding Andrew Lytle

A Review of The Southern Vision of Andrew Lytle, by Mark Lucas, Louisiana State University Press, 1987. Andrew Lytle’s writings comprise a rich and diverse tapestry whose outlines are difficult to bring together. The critic… » …

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Today in Southern History: The Alabama’s Last Fight

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Today in Southern History: The Alabama’s Last Fight

19 June 1864   On this date in 1864… The most successful warship in American history, the C.S.S. Alabama, suffering from damp and decaying gunpowder, lost a duel with the U.S.S. Kearsarge and sank in the English Channel off Cherbourg, France. Other Years: 1541 – Spanish Conquistador Hernando de Soto’s expedition met the Casqui tribe near present-day…

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Why Does the Left Really Despise the Confederacy?

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Why Does the Left Really Despise the Confederacy?

The South and its history are currently under assault, the most aggressive and far-reaching that we have ever seen, at least up to this point.  The monuments are gone in New Orleans and seem to… » …

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