Archive For The “Southern History” Category

Today in Southern History: De Soto and the Chickasaw

Today in Southern History: De Soto and the Chickasaw

3 January 1541  On this date in 1541… Hernando de Soto visited the main Chickasaw town. He got guides and interpreters for a planned visit to the Chickasaw town of Caluc. Other Years: 1823 – Stephen F. Austin received a land grant in Texas from the government of Mexico. 1861 – The Florida Secession Convention…

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Today in Southern History: The Young Brothers Massacre

Today in Southern History: The Young Brothers Massacre

2 January 1932  On this date in 1932… Small-time thieves, a portion of the Young Brothers gang killed six police officers of an ill-prepared posse sent to arrest them in a shootout at their family’s farm not far from Springfield, Missouri. Also known as the Brookline Shootout, it was the worst single killing of U.S….

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Today in Southern History: The Danbury Baptist Letter

Today in Southern History: The Danbury Baptist Letter

1 January 1802  On this date in 1802… Thomas Jefferson wrote his letter to the Danbury, Connecticut Baptist Association.  His words, “…the separation of Church and state…” were later taken out of context and used by Federal courts to erroneously forbid religious expression at public activities.  To this date, Jefferson’s letter is the only letter…

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Judas Bannon, Hillary’s House Fire, and Deep State Deception

Judas Bannon, Hillary’s House Fire, and Deep State Deception

by Al Benson Jr. Member, Board of Directors, Confederate Society of America Well, we have rocketed into the new year, with weather cold enough to freeze the ears off a brass monkey and growing paranoia amongst the ranks of the Swamp Dwellers in Sodom on the Potomac. The news today is that the Justice Department…

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Today in Southern History: Murfreesboro

Today in Southern History: Murfreesboro

31 December 1862  On this date in 1862… The Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee began. Other Years: 1794 – After agreeing to a peace with the United States on November 7th, the Cherokee, the Chickamauga band, and the U.S. exchanged prisoners, effectively ending the Chickamauga War. 1841 – Alabama became the first state to license dental…

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Happy New Year–We’re Not Updating Your InfoWars Connection!

Happy New Year–We’re Not Updating Your InfoWars Connection!

by Al Benson Jr. I just received, on 12/27. a New Year’s gift from Google. They decided not to update my InfoWars connection. All the other pages or email lists that I have listed seem to be getting updated daily except the InfoWars one. My first thought was “how petty!” But then I remembered that…

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Today in Southern History: Charleston Arsenal

Today in Southern History: Charleston Arsenal

 30 December 1860 On this date in 1860… South Carolina state troops seized the federal arsenal at Charleston. Other Years: 1853 – The United States bought about 45,000 square miles of land from Mexico in a deal known as the Gadsden Purchase. 1863 – Twenty Confederate States Marines froze to death after a federal warship swamped their…

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Today in Southern History: Chickasaw Bluffs

Today in Southern History: Chickasaw Bluffs

29 December 1862  On this date in 1862… Confederate troops under General Joseph E. Johnston repulsed federal General W.T. Sherman’s first attempt on Vicksburg at the Battle of Chickasaw Bluffs, Mississippi. Other Years: 1776 – Members of the Mingo tribe under Chief Pluggy attacked the stockade at John McClelland’s station, a settlement near modern-day Lexington,…

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Today in Southern History: Calhoun Resigns as VP

Today in Southern History: Calhoun Resigns as VP

28 December 1832  On this date in 1832… John C. Calhoun became the first vice-president in U.S. history to resign from office when a still higher tariff replaced the Tariff of Abominations of 1828.  He returned to South Carolina, had a state convention called, and directed the passage of the famous South Carolina Ordinance of…

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Chicago Needs To Think Twice Before Begging For UN “Peacekeeping” Troops

Chicago Needs To Think Twice Before Begging For UN “Peacekeeping” Troops

by Al Benson Jr. Member, Board of Directors, Confederate Society of America So the One World Government crowd in Chicago thinks they are doing the right thing by requesting United Nations “peacekeeping” troops to patrol their streets to root out crime and dispense with firearms? If you only had a clue as to what you…

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Today in Southern History: Stephen F. Austin Dies

Today in Southern History: Stephen F. Austin Dies

27 December 1836  On this date in 1836… Texas pioneer and impresario Stephen F. Austin died at West Columbia, Texas after a lengthy illness resulting from his imprisonment in Mexico. Other Years: 1761 – Creek Indians led by a chief known as “The Mortar” attacked several English in the “Long Canes” area of South Carolina…

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Today in Southern History: Anderson’s Provacative Move

Today in Southern History: Anderson’s Provacative Move

26 December 1860  On this date in 1860… Federal Major Robert Anderson secretly moved his troops from Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island, into Fort Sumter, aggravating the tense situation in Charleston, South Carolina. Other Years: 1811 – A theater fire in Richmond, Virginia killed the Governor  George William Smith and First National Bank of Virginia…

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Today in Southern History: Bermuda Hundred

Today in Southern History: Bermuda Hundred

25 December 1611  On this date in 1611… Sir Thomas Dale led a band of Jamestown colonists up the James River to burn the main Appomattoc village in retalliation for a September attack that killed 20 men. Dale built a new settlement called Bermuda Hundred at the site. Other Years: 1780 – John Sevier, and…

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Today in Southern History: The La Harpe Expedition

Today in Southern History: The La Harpe Expedition

24 December 1721  On this date in 1721… French explorer Benard de la Harpe started an expedition up the Arkansas River. With 16 Frenchmen, he travelled all the way to the Rocky mountains and returned. La Harpe recommend establishing a trading posts along his route to New Mexico. Other Years: 1798 – The Virginia state…

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Today in Southern History: The Battle of the Holy Ground

Today in Southern History: The Battle of the Holy Ground

23 December 1813  On this date in 1813… Approximately 850 militia from Natchez, led by Brigadier General Ferdinand Claiborne, and 150 Choctaws, led by Chief Pushmataha, attacked the Red Stick Creeks at a secret holy site, called the Hickory Ground, in Lowndes County, Alabama. The Creeks lost the “Battle of the Holy Ground” with many…

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Confederate statue in Myrtle Hill Cemetery seriously defaced

Confederate statue in Myrtle Hill Cemetery seriously defaced

Rome News-Tribune – The national controversy over historical monuments made its way to Rome this week when a Confederate monument atop historic Myrtle Hill Cemetery was cut up and smashed by a person or persons who went to a great deal of difficulty to make their statement. The statue that was defaced is of a…

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Today in Southern History: Morgan’s Raid

Today in Southern History: Morgan’s Raid

22 December 1862  On this date in 1862… General John Hunt Morgan’s Confederate cavalry crossed the Cumberland River to raid federal installations in occupied Kentucky. Other Years: 1769 – A Shawnee war party captured Daniel Boone. 1775 – A force of 1,500 Patriot rangers and militia captured a Loyalist force in Great Canebrake, South Carolina….

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Today in Southern History: Savannah Occupied

Today in Southern History: Savannah Occupied

21 December 1864  On this date in 1864… Federal General W.T. Sherman’s federal troops occupied Savannah, Georgia after Confederates evacuated the city.  Other Years: 1759 – A peace conference convened between the Cherokee and British representatives in North Carolina. 1804 – Two treaties the Cherokee signed to give up over four million acres for almost…

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Today in Southern History: The Flying Tigers

Today in Southern History: The Flying Tigers

20 December 1941  On this date in 1941… Southerner Claire Lee Chennault’s American Volunteer Group, the Flying Tigers, acting as part of the Chinese Air Force, were the first American forces to strike an offensive blow at the Japanese military when they dove on 10 Japanese bombers enroute to bomb Kunming, China.  The Flying Tigers’…

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United Nations Troops In Chicago? If they can get by with it!

United Nations Troops In Chicago? If they can get by with it!

by Al Benson Jr. Member, Board of Directors, Confederate Society of America UN troops policing Chicago? I thought maybe during the socialist reign of Comrade Obama, but during a Trump presidency? Well, yes, if they can get by with it. I read an article on Zero Hedge this evening (12/19) that basically asked this question–Is…

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