The Generation That Hates George Washington

An op-ed in a paper named for the father of our nation calls for renaming the university named for him.

George Washington was not only the general who led colonial forces to victory in the American Revolution. He was not only the father of our country and our nation’s first president. George Washington serves to this day as the model for presidential character. No wonder modern leftists hate him.

The Washington Post — a paper named for the town named for George Washington, mind you — ran an op-ed from a senior at George Washington University demanding a name change for the school. “Maybe rename the paper before running this?” National Review’s Dan McLaughlin teased. Or maybe if this snowflake student is so triggered, he could simply transfer to one of the hundreds of schools across the nation named for someone or something else.

More on that op-ed in a minute. First, let’s flashback to 2017 when a guy named Donald Trump was widely mocked by the Leftmedia for predicting this very thing:

“So this week it’s Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson’s coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?…”

Read the rest at the Patriot Post

Today in Southern History: The Pre-Revolution Revolution

16 May 1771  

On this date in 1771 – The Battle of Alamance, North Carolina was fought between royal militia and a group of rebels called “The Regulators” in present-day Alamance County, North Carolina. The regulators lost the battle and twelve were condemned to death. Six were hanged at Hillsboro, North Carolina on 19 June 1771. Many historians consider Alamance, not Lexington, to be the first battle of the first battle of the American War for Independence.

Other Years:
1760 – Creek Chief Handsome Fellow, a former English ally, led an attack on a group of English traders in Georgia in support of the Cherokee at the outbreak of the Cherokee war. Thirteen traders are killed in the fighting.
1817 – Steamboat service began on the Mississippi River.
1824 – Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith was born in St. Augustine, Florida.
1836 – At the age of 26, Edgar Allan Poe married his 13 year-old cousin, Virginia Clemm.
1861 – The Kentucky Legislature voted to remain neutral and reject Lincoln’s call for troops to subdue the Confederate States.
1861 – Tennessee was officially admitted to the Confederate States of America.
1868 – The United States Senate failed by one vote to convict U.S. President Andrew Johnson as it took its first ballot on one of 11 articles of impeachment against him. (Johnson was subsequently acquitted of all charges.)

Read: Why Know Southern History?

© 2022 KnowSouthernHistory.Org
All Rights Reserved

Courtesy of KnowSouthernHistory.Org

Today in Southern History: Wallace Shot

15 May 1972  

On this date in 1972…

Anti-Southern zealot Arthur Bremer shot and paralyzed Alabama Governor and Democrat presidential front-runner George Wallace as Wallace campaigned in Laurel, Maryland. In the aftermath of the assassination attempt, which ended Wallace’s presidential aspirations, the usual gun-control proponents were strangely silent.

Other Years:

  • 1716 – French commander Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville sent three Natchez allies to their village to bring back the head of a Chief Oyelape, the Natchez leader who ordered the killing of five Frenchmen.
  • 1802 – Confederate General Isaac Trimble was born in Culpepper County, Virginia..
  • 1846 – Texas Governor Pierce Butler, and Colonel M.G. Lewis (brother of Meriwether Lewis), and sixty-three representatives of the Aionai, Anadarko, Caddo, Comanche, Kichai, Lepan Apache, Longwha, Tahwacarro, Tonkawa, Waco, and Wichita tribes signed a peace treaty designed to protect both the Indians and Texas settlers.
  • 1862 – Federal General Benjamin Butler issued his infamous General Order #28 stating that any woman of New Orleans who showed disrespect for occupying yankees should be treated as a prostitute plying her trade.
  • 1862 – The Confederate cruiser Alabama was launched as the British ship Enrica at Birkenhead, England, where she had been built in secret.
  • 1864 – The cadets of Virginia Military Institute fought at the Battle of New Market, Virginia.
  • 1968 – A tornado struck Jonesboro, Arkansas at 10:00 PM, causing massive devastation and killing 36 people.
  • 1976 – The song “Kentucky Moonrunner” by Cledus Maggard hit #85 on the charts.

Read: Why Know Southern History?

© 2022 KnowSouthernHistory.Org
All Rights Reserved

Courtesy of KnowSouthernHistory.Org

Today in Southern History: Texas Independence!

14 May 1836  

On this date in 1836…

Mexican president and General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna signed the Treaties of Velasco, in which he agreed to withdraw his troops across the Rio Grande River and recognize the Republic of Texas in exchange for safe conduct back to Mexico.

Other Years:

  • 1607 – The first permanent British settlement in North America was established at Jamestown, Virginia.
  • 1787 – Delegates began gathering in Philadelphia for a convention to draw up the U.S. Constitution.
  • 1804 – The Lewis and Clark Expedition departed St. Louis, Missouri to explore the Louisiana Purchase.
  • 1980 – U.S. President Jimmy Carter established the Department of Health and Human Services. 
  • 1988 – A drunk driver going the wrong way on Interstate 71 near Carrollton, Kentucky, hit a church bus carrying a youth group. The crash and ensuing fire killed 27 children and adults.

Read: Why Know Southern History?

© 2022 KnowSouthernHistory.Org
All Rights Reserved

Courtesy of KnowSouthernHistory.Org